Category Archives: Inspiration4dyslexics

Forgotten Letters by dyslexics just in time for Dyslexia Awareness Week London Oct31 to Nov 6th 2011


“Forgotten Letters” by dyslexics; just in time for ‘Dyslexia Awareness Week 2011‘ in London, October 31 – November 6th 2011

Dyslexics may forget a few letters and twist them around when they write, but Naomi Folb the mastermind behind Forgotten Letters and the writers of the anthology, have explored the creative talents that make dyslexics superb writers.  Through the first published book of it’s kind she aims to honor their uniqueness. “Forgotten Letters” A Literary Anthology of dyslexics writers is by dyslexics and contains poetry, prose, short stories, and excerpts from longer publications.
http://www.facebook.com/#!/dyslexicwriting

Hold on a minute, who are these dyslexic writers?…
Writers who identify themselves as dyslexics, such as Philip Schultz (winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry); Benjamin Zephaniah (voted the nation’s third favourite poet of all time (after T S Eliot and John Donne) in a BBC poll in 2009 and included in The Times list of Britain’s top 50 post-war writers in 2008), Billy Childish (co-founder of the Stuckism Art Movement); Andrew Solomon (winner of the 2001 National Book Award and finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize); Thomas West (author of Thinking Like Einstein and In the Mind’s Eye) and Sally Gardner, (winner of the 2005 Nestlé Children’s Book Prize Gold Award and, shortlisted for the British Children’s Book of the Year in 2006) and many other successful writers, including Caroline Gardner, who has contributed the four anthologies that will be included in the British Library and distributed in further libraries across the U.K. and Republic of Ireland.

This unique book will be launched by RASP just in time for ‘Dyslexia Awareness Week 2011′ in London, October 31 – November 6th 2011, (at 26 Crowndale Road, NW1 1TT London, United Kingdom). (The book will be introduced on November 2nd at 6pm).

RASP will be launching the book there. The aim of the festival is to bring together dyslexic writers, artists, performers and creatives to network and showcase their work. There will be performances, music, readings, talks as well as an exhibition. www.facebook.com/dyslexicwriting?ref=ts

Copies of Forgotten Letters will be available to buy at the launch. They can be purchased thereafter online through Amazon and www.r-a-s-p.co.uk or on line. It’s £15  $24(US).

World renowned writer Margaret Atwood is sponsoring the Forgotten Letters campaign and you can help by buying this book or sponsoring the next book to be made.  The Queen herself has shown support of this project since Princess Beatrice is also dyslexic.

The Dyslexia Think Tank (Dyslexiathinktank.org) board vice chairman and creative director, Kristi Frlekin, says she is “especially proud to promote this terrific project”.
Kristi Frlekin and Rose Kuntz, the Dyslexia Think Tank chairman, are going to London from sunny California for the launch.

There are so many great samples in the book, but I picked out this one because I loved the tile, and it’s so descriptive  Here is a sample. Enjoy.

Penny the Pig
By Kristen McHenry

Penny’s favorite sucker, her ever-lasting
gobstopper, was a plastic Fun Family Collection
boy-teenager figurine in a red striped
t-shirt and khakis, with a stiff curlicue of
yellow hair, and black slash eyebrows. His
shoes were lumpy white globs of resin
like something had gone
wrong on the assembly line.
She dug him up behind the barn the night Cecily
left him there during the hailstorm.
Penny kept him safe from the other pigs; dragged
him off and buried him each night, sat
jealously near his dirt hole,
until she dug him up again, rolled
him with her overheated tongue, and
shook him in her mouth as though to snap
his rigid little neck. After a week
he was a pockmarked mess, his brows
mottled with teeth pricks and his
blob-shoes dull with grime.
Penny had made him his own. Broken him in.
Penny screamed and grunted the night Cecily
figured where he was and stole him back. She smacked Penny
with a split-off fence panel and ran
into the house sobbing, clutching the boy by his
dented chest. She spent all night scouring
his body with a potato scrubber, and painting
his shoes with Great Grape nail polish.
She filled in his brows with magic marker and put him
back on her bed stand with the dad, the Grandpa, the
Mom, the prim sister,
and the squinty aunt with a feather hat.

________
If your dyslexic and missed that deadline to write in the book, there will be more to come in the future so look out for RASP, in the meantime check it out!

By Stacy Poulos
http://www.dyslexia.tv/ 

Dyslexia TV & FreeThinkers University

Proudly sponsored and designed by
http://www.playback.net

Make your own blog @ SuperGeniusWebsites.com 

I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world. Albert Einstein

“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”  Albert Einstein

Apples Founder Steve Jobs Connecting The Dots By Stacy Poulos

 Apples Founder Steve Jobs Connecting The Dots By Stacy Poulos

It always amazes me the similarities in the journeys of my dyslexic colleagues. I guess I never looked at the fact that I “Dropped Out” of College to pursue my own courses of interests, when the school system held me back for refusing to be tested in areas I had already completed, along with all the prerequisites to get there. I never really quit educating myself. That took a lot of discipline.  I just changed my course of how I was going to get that same education I sought after in the first place; to be a filmmaker. I didn’t go to college, just to do it. Unlike Steve Jobs that didn’t know what he wanted, I knew since I was a kid. I just knew I wasn’t going to get that piece of paper that said that I went through the education. Or to be able to write on a resume BA Filmmaking. “”I”” realized back then, that in the end it was just going to have to be on the merit of my talent and work. That is what I focused on as being truly important. It took moxy to know that, and go against the system and continue for years. But I did it and I’m a award winning director/cinematographer today. Not in a huge way, just in a very respected way. And now I have connected the dots that, that discipline I took on, is what makes me a continued success. It keep rewarding me as I went along. That discipline is what makes me know I have to change with time, and that is what keeps me successful today. As I am always continuing to learn to keep up with technology and apply my old film values and techniques to new technologies.

I love Steve Jobs he’s one of my favorite dyslexic’s because if it wasn’t for “apple” I would have been anti computers, this I know for sure. You must see his speech on our channel.

In Steve Jobs address to Stanford College graduating class of 2005 he spoke about connecting the dots. Where later in life you realize if that one ‘over whelming failure’ in your life at the time, hadn’t happen, he wouldn’t have achieved the same results in life.

Steve Jobs: “I never graduated from college. Truth be told,… … The first story is about connecting the dots. I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit. So why did I drop out?

…After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting…

…Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed.

…Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this.

…None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it’s likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.
Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.”  -Steve Jobs



Link: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2005/june15/jobs-061505.html
‘You’ve got to find what you love,’ Jobs says

This is a prepared text of the Commencement address delivered by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, on June 12, 2005.

I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world. I never graduated from college. Truth be told, this is the closest I’ve ever gotten to a college graduation. Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That’s it. No big deal. Just three stories.

The first story is about connecting the dots.

I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit. So why did I drop out?

It started before I was born. My biological mother was a young, unwed college graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption. She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife. Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl. So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: “We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?” They said: “Of course.” My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers. She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would someday go to college.

And 17 years later I did go to college. But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.

It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5¢ deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. Let me give you one example:

Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed. Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture, and I found it fascinating.

None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it’s likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.

Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.

My second story is about love and loss.

I was lucky — I found what I loved to do early in life. Woz and I started Apple in my parents garage when I was 20. We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees. We had just released our finest creation — the Macintosh — a year earlier, and I had just turned 30. And then I got fired. How can you get fired from a company you started? Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me, and for the first year or so things went well. But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out. When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him. So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out. What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.

I really didn’t know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down – that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me. I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly. I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley. But something slowly began to dawn on me — I still loved what I did. The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit. I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over.

I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.

During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT, another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife. Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature film, Toy Story, and is now the most successful animation studio in the world. In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT, I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple’s current renaissance. And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.

I’m pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn’t been fired from Apple. It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it. Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith. I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.

My third story is about death.

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my l
ife, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn’t even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months. My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.

I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and I’m fine now.

This was the closest I’ve been to facing death, and I hope it’s the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960′s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Thank you all very much.

By Stacy Poulos
http://www.dyslexia.tv/

Dyslexia TV & FreeThinkers University

Proudly sponsored and designed by
http://www.playback.net & http://www.GirlpagesNetwork.com

Make your own blog @ SuperGeniusWebsites.com

By Stacy Poulos
www.dyslexia.tv/

 

“Faces Of Dyslexia” On Facebook


For years I have had dyslexic’s submit their photo, quote and city of where there from for a project animation “Faces Of Dyslexia”™ I put the Faces on our facebook Fan Page. If your not a fan, make sure you are for updates. By Stacy Poulos 

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150314289725688.367287.228517030687&type=1


Community Grant – Help a Sister Out -Time to renew – 120 people At 25 Bucks Puts DyslexiaTV in the Green

Link: Paypal: inspiration4dyslexics@dyslexia.tv


 


Well, with out funding, Dyslexia TV has proven to be an important part of the dyslexic community and I reach 9,000 visitors a MONTH from all over the world. That’s just amazing really. One woman, from a small town.

I’m hoping my dyslexic friends or friends of Dyslexics can help me out, November 15th Dyslexia.TV names and hosting, as well as FreeThinkersUniversity.org, etc., -8- names are due. Dyslexia.tv is a premium name so it costs a lot more. And I’m $2,824.00 away from paying off the equipment that ran out the door making my Dyslexia.TV podcast in 2008.

I am not a “Non-profit”. So if you contribute, it is not tax deductible. Your just truly giving to help me carry on Dyslexia.TV… Sort of a community grant. I’d like to be a non-profit, it’s just too much paper work.

So I calculated; if 120 people donated 25 bucks Dyslexia.TV will be in the green. Don’t stress yourselves out over it, I know it’s hard times for a lot of people. I have faith it will come.

Eventually, I’m hoping to use the music I write to help benefit my cause. Until then I’ve got to pay the piper cash. If I ended up with extra, I have a list of things I need to do; from making a coloring calendar for kids, recreating the podcast, to my logo redesigned.

Thank you for your support!!

You can write a check to
Dyslexia.TV
P.o. Box 20608
Castro Vally, CA 94546

or
Pay with pay pall the accepts MC Visa, debit,  blah, blah, blah.
Click on the banner:




Peace, Stacy Poulos
http://www.dyslexia.tv/

Dyslexia TV & FreeThinkers University


Determination


Determination is like spilled water flowing on a mission, it doesn’tstop until it reaches its goal. It doesn’t always know its being pulledby an invisible force manifested by gravitation, the human spirit. Thedirection isn’t always as relevant as its missions journey that survivesobstacles, because of the compelling pull of gravitation to itsdestiny. A journey that has no end because it resides in the heart andsoul. -Stacy Poulos Author / Life In A Nutshell

Photo “My Favorite Perspective” City Of Refuge, HI; By Stacy Poulos 2008

http://www.dyslexia.tv/

Dyslexia TV & FreeThinkers University

Proudly sponsored and designed by
http://www.playback.net

Make your own blog @ SuperGeniusWebsites.com

Dyslexic Teen, Jessica Watson is now the Youngest to Sail Around the World. She Lands in Front of the Sydney Opera House, Designed by a Dyslexic


After nearly seven months on her own, sailing around the world in the deep blue sea, days away from her finish line, Jessica Watson contemplates her “two more sleeps till the finish line!” (An Australian phrase). She’s thinking about a hot shower, fresh food and everything else! She’s more excited than if it were Christmas. 

“I think it’s going to take a fair bit longer than that for the whole ‘I’ve just sailed around the world’ thing to sink in. It’s just too big to get my head around!”  Jessica wrote on her blog. 

Although this 16-year-old says she enjoyed being away from her “annoying” brother, she also misses him. And of course her Mum and Dad. Ella’s Pink Lady, a 30 foot yacht, assisted her round-the-world trip, but not with out reminding her the dangers of such a journey. [See previous article]

Saturday, May 15, 2010 Jessica Watson sailed into Australia’s Sydney Harbor, past thousands of boats awaiting her arrival. Thousands of people lined up along the harbor, inspired by her young and unwavering bravery. From a sea of ocean and fish to a sea of people, everyone gave her a hero’s welcome. I wish I could have been there.

When you look at her journey on a map, the GPS path resembles an spike in a heart beat monitor. The sea can be unforgiving but graced Jessica with the right of passage. It was an uplifting passage to all, especially herself, and a boost for those who followed her journey. The beginning of her journey started when she didn’t feel she had a lot going for her because of her dyslexia. Her mother read her a book “The Lion’s Heart” that sparked her determination to be the next youngest to sail around the world solo. Although there is not an official ‘world record’ kept anymore (because it is to dangerous to challenge), it was about the journey. The outer journey and the inner journey.  Jesse Martin did it when he was 18, and now Jessica Watson has at 16. As everyone looks to Jessica and cheers her on, I look behind her, and the fact she rode in and was welcomed in front the most famous masterpiece in Australia, “The Sydney Opera House” designed by Jørn Utzon, also dyslexic.


By Stacy Poulos
http://www.dyslexia.tv/

Dyslexia TV & FreeThinkers University

Proudly sponsored and designed by
http://www.playback.net 



Make your own blog @ SuperGeniusWebsites.com © 2010

One Tough Cookie: The Journey of a Dyslexic 16 year old, Jessica Watson, Sails Around the World


It’s not often, not often at all, when a fellow dyslexic (or anyone for that manner) gives me the chills when I hear about their journey. Or that it stays in my head throughout the day, constantly thinking, “Wow!!” But this journey isn’t one I would recommend, even for a seasoned adult.  It is one that would wrap up a lifetime of searching for answers in one good day, and certainly force you to grow up in one big wave. This is the journey of sixteen-year-old Jessica Watson.  Right now, she is somewhere Down Under in the deep blue ocean on her last stretch towards home of her six month journey around the world. She started out on October 17, 2009, determined to beat the record of Jesse Martin, the youngest to sail around the world unassisted. Monday, April 19, 2010 marked the sixth month into her journey of over 20,000 miles. 

She sails on a sponsored boat she named “Ella’s Pink Lady.” Another sponsor, Panasonic, is allowing her to video tape her journey and SatCom which allows her to communicate it back home via satellite. In the meantime, she has been journaling her experience almost bi weekly through blogging photos and stories to her website , and videos on Youtube , tweets on twitter , etc.

If the thought of this journey doesn’t give you white knuckles and make you want to hold your breath thinking about it, get this: Before she started her journey on a 10-day test run, she was broadsided by a huge 63,000 ton cargo vessel, the Silver Yang. The ship ripped her sail and broke her mast like a toothpick, sending it crashing down in the MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, ALONE! 

Imagine. It’s not as if you can turn on the porch light, look out to a lit street and identify the Mac Truck that hit your house and call for help.  You’re alone, you’re asleep, you’re 16, (maybe a little crazy), you’re in the middle of the ocean on a small boat, it’s 2:30 in the morning and suddenly you get hit by something of which you’re not sure of yet. You look out your porthole thinking, “What the heck!!” ‘Cause whatever it is, it’s so big you can’t see both ends to identify it. If you had the chance to yell at whoever hit you, they’re steering the boat from half a football field away and can’t hear you. When the cargo ship hit her, they didn’t even bother to stop, leaving her in the dust to survive on her own. 

Did I mention that she is 16?

The journey alone has been an inspiration but not without mixed reviews. Many think the parents are crazy for letting her go in the first place.  Many might sit alone on their boat after an encounter like that and think it’s a sign from God not to go on.

Or if you’re one tough cookie like Jessica Watson, you would be empowered by surviving such an encounter. An encounter with a 63,000 ton cargo vessel, an encounter with an ignorant public, or an encounter with a school system that doesn’t understand how to teach a multi-dimensional Freethinker, a Lion heart and spirit. 

What ails this teenager to take such a daring journey? Inspiration came from the book The 

Lionsheart about Jesse Martin’s journey and, (in the back of her mind), a bit of 

frustration with her thoughts of her future with dyslexia. Jessica Watson didn’t just 

wake up one day after being inspired by the book; she was already an avid sailor 

for years. Since she started, there has been a lot of media coverage about the ride 

and a lot of ignorance from the public. Like one idea, “How can she write when she 

has dyslexia?”


 Oh, you mean like how dyslexic authors Hans Christian Anderson, 

Agatha Christie, Earnest Hemingway, Steven Cannell, Fannie Flagg, Patricia Polacco, 

Debbie Macomber, Andrew Dornenburg, William Butler Yeats, Stacy Poulos, and 

author Mark Twain (just to name a few who managed to write books). For me, she is an 

inspiration. She reminds me of my youth, of not understanding my dyslexia yet being 

determined to follow my heart. 

 

 As I know, she (and others) wonder about her dyslexia and what future she might 

have. She was even quoted as saying, “I didn’t have anything going for me.” I can

understand the reason why one might feel this way. What she doesn’t realize now

(but hope she will in her last stretch home) is that she sails in the spirit of so many who 

have shared her frustration and succeeded. She is surrounded by them. 


A few more dyslexic names that came to mind when reading about 

this journey are explorers:  Inventor William Lear, inventors Orville & Wilbur 

Wright, aviator Charles Lindbergh, 19-year-old playwright Danielle Mullen, 

Arctic explorer Ann Bancroft and astronaut Charles “Pete” Conrad Jr.  She 

also has dyslexic neighbors: Managing Director of Parle Foods Australia, Anthony 

Parle (supplier of McDonalds Pickles), and singer, songwriter, and activist John Lennon. 

Oh, and the most famous building masterpiece in Australia which she is pictured sailing in front of. The Sydney Opera House was designed by Jørn Utzon, also dyslexic. 


These are your colleagues, Jessica Watson. You have a greater

 future than you could ever imagine.. starting with your motivation and sense of adventure. 

Harness your assets, and you have more than you know. 

 

 Go Jessica Watson, God Bless your journey.  

 Please join my FreeThinkers University, it would be my honor! You are an example of why 

 I am so passionate about producing Dyslexia TV and FreeThinkers University.

150 Famous dyslexics [dyslexia.tv] 

PS Jessica I need a "Notable Quote"


See Video Ten News - April 15th

By Stacy Poulos
http://www.dyslexia.tv/ 

Dyslexia TV & FreeThinkers University

Jessicas Blog: http://www.jessicawatson.com.au

Proudly sponsored and designed by
http://www.playback.net

Make your own blog @ SuperGeniusWebsites.com © 2010

Television’s Most Prolific Writer, Spanning 3 Decades; Steven Cannell Demystifies His Life As A Dyslexic Writer


As dyslexia makes some areas of academia difficult, it doesn’t make

it impossible. Just ask Steven Cannell. It made some areas of his life

difficult, but certainly not impossible. At this time he has written

15 novels, including the critically acclaimed Shane Scully series. He

became one of television’s most prolific writers, spanning three

decades. His TV hits include: Greatest American Hero, The A-Team,

Hunter, Riptide, Hardcastle & McCormick, 21 Jump Street, Wiseguy, The

Commish, Renegade and Silk Stalkings. And one I watched often growing

up, The Rockford Files. Who knew, from all those days of watching the The

Rockford Files, it was written by a man who had dyslexia. 


Those days I was struggling to get through English, and closet writing. Cannell came as an

affirmation before my very eyes that the difficulties I was experiencing

didn’t have to shame my ambition to write. It didn’t stop me from

writing, it all just went into a storage bin in my closet because I

was still compelled to write regardless of the discouragement I got

from teachers. (The “authorities” in writing?) Eventually some of those

stories got pieced together in a funny book “Life In A Nutshell.”

Check it out Steven, let me know what you think.


Cannell is not ashamed to advocate that he had dyslexia. In fact, if you

click on the link you will see a series of videos where Cannell

talks about his dyslexia as he attempts to demystify what it meant

in his life to become a big time Hollywood writer. 


Right on Steven. Have your people call my people.


http://www.cannell.com/dyslexia.php

By Stacy Poulos
http://www.dyslexia.tv/

Dyslexia TV & FreeThinkers University

Proudly sponsored and designed by
http://www.playback.net


Make your own blog @ SuperGeniusWebsites.com